MARTIAL ARTS (part 1)
MARTIAL ARTS, various martial arts and self-defense systems of predominantly East Asian origin; developed mainly as a means of conducting hand-to-hand combat. Currently practiced in many countries around the world…

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SLAVIC-GORITSKAYA FIGHT (part4)
PROHIBITED TECHNIQUES AND VIOLATIONS OF RULES. Limitations on permissible technical methods in the Slavic-Goritsky struggle are minimal and are associated mainly with the peculiarities of a particular style. So, in…

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PREPARATION OF KARATISTS
The three main components in karate training are kihon, kata and kumite. KIHON - development of basic karate techniques by the method of repeated repetitions. Kata - Complexes of complexly…

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FIGHT IN ANCIENT RUSSIA

In Russia, wrestling has always been popular. Along with fist fights, it was both entertainment and a vital necessity: wars in Russia practically did not stop. The fight also had a cult significance – the so-called bear fight. Among the ancient Slavs, the bear was considered the patron and protector. The fight in honor of the bear was carried out on the field before the start of sowing: it was believed that this would save the future crop. Several other types of wrestling arose from the bear one: such as wrestling in the “cross” – martial arts in a stand with mutual capture, as well as wrestling with a live bear – fair entertainment with a trained beast, as well as a kind of skill test – a one-on-one struggle with the owner the woods.

From the pagan representations of the Slavs, the system of training the necessary fighting qualities, survival skills, and “medical knowledge” passed into the struggle. The combat training was based on pagan symbols and concepts: the circle – the cult of the Sun, the principle of conservation of energy, white-god and black-god – positive and negative movements from oneself and to oneself, etc.

Fighting (pugilism) was a way of resolving legal disputes (the relevant provisions are recorded in Russian Truth), and sometimes international conflicts. The Lavrentievsky Chronicle (993) describes how the Russian prince agreed to decide the outcome of the battle with the Pecheneg army using a duel between two heroes. The Russian warrior tore the Pecheneg from the ground and strangled him – that was all over.

The Orthodox Church did not encourage sports hobbies in general – and martial arts in particular. At a church council in Vladimir in 1274, Metropolitan Cyril declared that the people still followed the customs of worthless Hellenes and were engaged in demonic games – fist fights. But despite numerous attempts to ban wrestling and fist fights, it failed.

SLAVIC-GORITSKAYA FIGHT (part3)
GENERAL PROVISIONS. Competitions in the Slavic-Goritsky wrestling are held in all these styles - with the exception of the breast - according to approximately similar rules. (In flexible rebuilding fights…

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KICKBOXING (part 2)
RULES AND COMPETITIONS. In the beginning, kickboxing rules did not exist as such. Any punches and kicks, sweeps, steps, grabs and throws were allowed. There was also no division into…

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AIKIDO
AIKIDO, a type of Japanese martial art created from several jujitsu schools; literally - the path ("before") harmony ("ah") of vital energy ("ki"). Aikido differs from other martial arts in…

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PASSIVE WRESTLING
In order to stimulate the active actions of wrestlers, a rule was introduced at the time according to which athletes were punished with penalty points for passive wrestling. Currently, this…

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